Description
There is an urgent need to enhance the resilience of developing countries to climate and weather shocks in order to foster sustainable development. Better management of current climate variability can help societies better adapt to future climate change. For example, effective use of sub-seasonal to seasonal forecasts of rainfall hold the promise of effective early warning systems for floods and droughts, and actionable information for decision makers in agriculture, water management, and public health. Meanwhile, robust use of climate change scenarios can inform longer term policy decisions on time-scales of decades. For these applications, it is essential to build capacities for researchers, policy-makers and practitioners in developing countries to appropriately use climate information for evidence-based planning, and to apply a systems thinking lens towards discerning how climate considerations weave into interconnected sectoral issues. This one-week workshop therefore highlights the need for mainstreaming the integration of climate information into systems across sectors. Researchers and policy-makers need to understand the basics of climate data and their sources and uncertainties, and to become familiar with simple techniques for processing and distilling these into useful information for different scenarios or contexts. To achieve this, a lectures combined with hands-on exercises will be implemented. Participating researchers and practitioners will guided towards the application of concepts and techniques learned towards specific applications in their respective sectors, which will serve as the culminating activity of the workshop.

TOPICS:
  • Sources of climate data (e.g. IPCC Climate Atlas, Copernicus C3S, ERA5, CMIP, CORDEX, hydro-met agencies)
  • Basic Linux-based techniques for processing climate data
  • Use of RS-GIS for climate-related applications
  • Systems approach to the climate-land-energy-water nexus
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